Don’t fight doubt with dirt.

When I was a kid, I thought quicksand was going to be a much bigger deal than it has turned out to be in my life. Learning and reading about quicksand, I thought for sure that by now, I would have needed to be rescued from quicksand. After all, quicksand is a really big problem and a dangerous common occurrence, right? Turns out I was wrong. To this day, I have yet to encounter the perils of quicksand.

Last summer, though, I was exploring a creek with my kids, and we came across some really thick mud with a thin layer of water over it. One of my kids stepped in it and sank in deep enough to get stuck and then almost lose a boot when getting pulled out. We were fascinated by this, as it was the closest thing to quicksand any of us had ever experienced. Thus, we proceeded to “play in the mud” and take turns rescuing one another from what we pretended was quicksand.

One thing was clear during this little adventure – the way to get out of that mud was not by using the surrounding mud. Even the dirt nearby was not helpful because it turned to mud, too. What we needed was help – the help of a person on solid ground, the help of a tree limb, and the footing of a firm foundation.

The difficulties of life are like that mud. Easily, we can get sucked in and stuck in the struggles, frustrations, stress, and devastation. What can rescue us then? How can we escape the perils of our fallen world?

Because of this reality, we all naturally struggle with doubts. Uncertainties, as a result of our obvious limitations and inadequacies, abound. We continuously have doubts, which lead to fear, discouragement, and failures.

How can we fight those doubts, then? How can we press on and not get sucked into the traps? How can we live a life of hope, assurance, and peace when there is so much evil, turmoil, difficulty, stress, and frustration?

Unfortunately, just like my kids and I foolishly thought we could “master” that mud on our own and be the first one to get out of the sinkhole without help, we so often do this with our doubts and fears. When my kids and I would get stuck in the sinking mud, we would grasp for the closest dirt bank we could reach, but it too would turn to mud. It looked firm and helpful, but it was not. We needed something solid and firm and immune to the softening effects of the water. Otherwise, we would only be digging ourselves further into the mud.

Likewise, when we face our doubts and try to conquer those doubts with “dirt” – some seemingly helpful solutions that only turn to mud and throw us deeper into the pit of doubt and despair – then we are hopeless. Dirt cannot save you from mud because it just turns into more mud, especially when the waters of difficulty do not recede.

Do not fight doubt with dirt. You need the rescue that can pull you from the mud. You need the foundation that can keep you on solid ground. You need the Rock!

On Sunday morning, Lord willing, I will be starting a new sermon series (Help My Unbelief: Dealing with Doubt), preaching this first message from Matthew 11:2-6 on going “From Doubt to Pursuit.” When you struggle with doubt, respond by pursuing Jesus. He alone is the Rock who can deliver you from the mud of despair.

Are you struggling with debilitating doubt, perhaps resulting in fear and despair, because of your circumstances? Jesus alone is the answer. He is the Rock, whereas every other supposed answer is nothing more than dirt. I invite you to trust in Him for hope and peace, and continually depend on Him for the strength to press on and endure. You will not regret trusting the firm foundation of His Word and the power of His Spirit.

To learn how to know and follow God in a right and growing relationship with Him, please check out The Story.

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